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The Real Value of Art

What is your art worth? Or a better question is: What is your art worth to you?
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Hollyhocks at Chester Cathedral by Marina Jacobs
If you are buying a piece of original art or even a limited edition print, how do you know if it is worth the price? There is a huge variation on price of art. I know artists who sell beautiful paintings for just £40 and I also know artists who sell their work for up to £5000 (not to mention the famous ones whose work sell for millions of pounds). Or perhaps you are buying art for an investment; you want to know if the art you are thinking of buying will increase in value.

The answer depends on how you define 'value.'

If you are looking for something that will increase in monetary value, then buying a piece by a well know or up-and-coming artist is probably your best bet; buy from an artist for whom demand for their work has outstripped supply. We all know that when supply - of any commodity - can't keep up with the demand for it, the value/cost increases.

If, however, you are looking for a piece of art that has personal value, than it really doesn't matter how well known the artist is, how much the painting cost you, if it will be worth more money in twenty years' time. What matters is that you love it; that you will hang it on your wall and look at it every single day and each time you do, it will give you joy!

That, I feel, is the real value of art. As Pablo Picasso said: “Art washes away from the soul the dust of every day life.”

And that value can increase. Often you will fall more and more in love with a painting the more you look at it. A few weeks ago I hung one of my recent paintings on my bedroom wall - a 50 x 120 cm oil on canvas of a window in Chester Cathedral with hollyhocks growing in front. I really liked the painting before, but now, having seen it every day, I really love it! I find myself gazing at it, looking into the shadows, finding new, interesting things in it. For me, that painting has increased in value.

So yes, buying art that may increase in monetary value is an investment but buying a piece of art that you just love, that will make you smile every time you look at it is also an investment; an investment in your well being and happiness.

Marina

To see works as they become available, follow me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/marinajacobs.paintings/
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